Service or Repairs

 

 

 

 

 

MVP Services has Raleigh's #1 pressure washing repair shop for both residential & commercial pressure washers.  Our full service shop can assist you with setting up your equipment or trailer, regular maintenance, and much more!  

Some Of Our Services:

  • Hot or Cold Water Machine Service
  • Pump Repair
  • Surface Cleaner Repair
  • Trailer Setups
  • Small Engine Repair
  • Hose Reels
  • & Much More!
 
We currently do NOT work on the following:
Karcher Pumps- We do not offer replacement parts for the Karcher pumps. All other components of the machine we can work on.
Devilbiss- We can only replace the pump not work on them internally
Electric Machines- Please contact our office with more information to determine if we can assist you. 
 

Hot Water Pressure Washers

When washing your dishes you learned that hot water makes cleaning easier, especially when cleaning greases, oils, or petrochemicals.

Cold water can only be as efficient when proper cleaning chemicals are also employed and even then only in certain situautions. A hot washer can often make cleaning up to 50% faster by efficiently loosening dirt, gum, grease and oil. The hot washer is by far the most popular among proffessional contract cleaners. Contract cleaners make extensive use of hot water and effective chemicals to save on their highest overhead cost, LABOR. For every dollar spent for fuel to heat water and chemicals to break the bond between the grime and substrate up to 9 dollars in labor savings can be achieved. This 9:1 internal leverage is what makes a hot washer a virtual no brainer for the serious cleaning professional.

A hot pressure washer consists of two power systems: the pump and motor system which creates the high-pressure water flow, and the burner and coil system that heats this stream of pressurized water. The pump and motor can be can be gas powered or electric. The burner and coil system requires electricity to run the burner motor and kerosene, diesel oil or propane gas to heat the pressurized water in the heavy-duty heating coil.

If the hot pressure washer is electric powered, you use the same electricity to power both the pump and motor system as well as the burner and coil system. However, you still burn diesel, kerosene or liquid propane gas (LPG) as fuel to heat the water.

If the unit uses a gas engine to power the pump, you still need electricity to power the burner and coil system.

Most gas engine units will use a self-contained power source such as a 12V battery or 115V generator to create the electrical power source to run the heating coil and burner system, because of this crirical system a hot pressure washer is significantly heavier, more complex and more difficult to maintain than a cold water unit. But even with all that, the hot pressure washer is the fastest growing segment in the pressure washing industry. This is proof positive as to their effectiveness.


How to Troubleshoot Your Pressure Washer Pump

In nearly all instances, pressure washer pump failure is the result of improper installation or operation rather than normal wear. One of the most common causes of pump failure is improper or unnecessary service, often as a result of the operator attempting the service.

Each time the pressure pump is serviced, the chance of pump failure as a result of improper service increases. The operator should be left with no reason or desire to open the pump for service.

Usually requests for service are not made until the operation of the equipment has become so bad that it usually does not work.

"The high pressure pump is generally one of the most dependable and best constructed components in a high pressure cleaner. The well-engineered pump may be installed in a not-so-well engineered system." All pumps have wear parts, which eventually need to be replaced.

"In most cases, the high pressure pump is likely to outlast most other components as long as the pump is installed correctly and the system is operated properly." (This is a quote from The Universal Guide to High Pressure and Steam Cleaner Repair

 

Problem

 

 

Probable Cause
Solution

 

 

Oil Leak Between Crankcase and Pumping Section Worn crankcase piston rod seals. Replace crankcase piston rod seals.
O-rings on plunger retainer worn. Replace o-rings.
Frequent or Premature Failure Of the Packing Scored, damaged or worn plunger. Replace plungers.
Overpressure to inlet manifold. Reduce inlet pressure.
Abrasive material in the fluid being pumped. Install proper filtration on pump inlet plumbing.
Excessive pressure and/or temperature of fluid being pumped. Check pressures and fluid inlet temperature; be sure they are within specified range.
Over pressure of pumps. Reduce pressure.
Ran without water. Do not run pump without water.
Pump Runs but Produces no Flow Pump is not primed. Flood suction then restart pump.
Pump Fails to Prime Air is trapped inside pump. Disconnect discharge hose from pump. Flood suction hose, restart pump and run pump until all air has been evacuated.
Pump Loses Prime, Chattering Noise, Pressure Thread Fluctuates Air leak in suction hose or inlet fittings. Remove suction line and inspect it for a loose liner or debris lodged in hose. Avoid all unnecessary bends. Do not kink hose.
Clogged suction strainer. Clean strainer.
Low Pressure at Nozzle Unloader valve is bypassing. Make sure unloader is adjusted properly and bypass seat is not leaking.
Incorrect or worn nozzle. Make sure nozzle is matched to the flow and pressure of the pump. If the nozzle is worn, replace.
Restricted intake. Refer to above priming information.
Pump is Noisy Pump sucking air. Check suction manifold.
Pressure Gauge Fluctuates Valves worn or blocked by foreign bodies. Clean or replace valves.
Packing worn. Replace packing.
Pumped liquid temperature too high. Reduce temperature of pumped liquid.
Over Pressure When Gun is Closed . Leaking in unloader valve and incorrect setting. Control the valve and set new pressure level.
Pulsation Faulty pulsation damper. Check pre-charge; if low, recharge it or install a new one.
Low Pressure Worn nozzle. Replace with nozzle of proper size.
Belt slippage. Tighten or replace with correct belt.
Air leak in inlet plumbing. Disassemble, reseal and reassemble.
Relief valve stuck, partially plugged or improperly adjusted valve seat worn. Clean and adjust relief valve; check for worn or dirty valve seats. Kit available.
Inlet suction strainer clogged or improperly sized. Clean. Use adequate size. Check more frequently.
Worn Packing. Abrasives in pumped in cavitation. Inadequate water. Install proper filter. Suction at inlet manifold must be limited to lifting less than 20 feet of water or 8.5 psi vacuum.
Fouled or dirty inlet or discharge valves. Clean inlet and discharge valve assemblies.
Worn inlet, discharge valve blocked or dirty. Replace worn valves, valve seats and/or discharge hose.
Leak in the discharge line. Repair leak.
Pump Runs Extremely Rough, Pressure Very Low Restricted inlet or air entering the inlet plumbing. Proper size inlet plumbing; Check for air tight seal.
Inlet restrictions and/or air leaks. Stuck inlet or discharge valve. Clean out foreign material. Replace worn valves. Replace worn cup or cups.
Water Leakage From Under Manifold. Slight Leakage Worn packing. Install new packing.
Oil Leaking in the Area of Crankshaft Worn crankshaft seal or improperly installed oil seal o-ring. Remove oil seal retainer and replace damaged o-ring and/or seals.
Bad bearing. Replace bearing.
Excessive Play in the End of the Crankshaft Pulley Worn main bearing from excessive tension on drive belt. Replace crankcase bearing and/or tension drive belt.
Water in Crankcase Humid air condensing into water inside the crankcase. Change oil intervals. Use any high grade automotive 30 weight non-detergent oil.
Worn packing and/or piston rod sleeve, o-rings on plunger retainer worn. Replace o-rings. Replace packing.
Oil Leaking from Underside of Crankcase Worn crankcase piston rod seals. Replace seals.
Oil Leaking at the RearPortion of the Crankcase Worn crankcase piston rod seals. Replace seals.
Loud Knocking Noise in Pump Pulley loose on crankshaft. Check key and tighten set screw.
Broken or worn bearing. Replace bearing.

 

 

How to Find the Right Nozzle Size

Red 0° Nozzle
This is a blasting nozzle. It delivers a very concentrated stream of water. Care should be used to avoid gouging wood or damaging fragile surfaces. Uses: Removing weeds from sidewalk cracks, stubborn stains and chewing gum from concrete, masonry, aluminum and steel, caked mud from equipment and cleaning lawn mower undersides.

Yellow 15° Nozzle
This is a chiseling nozzle. The spray should be directed at a 45° angle to the surface and used like a scraper to remove paint, grease and dirt. Uses: Surface preparation (removing peeling paint and mildew stains), cleaning gutters and downspouts and bugs from trucks.

Green 25° Nozzle
This is a flushing nozzle. With a narrower spray pattern than the 40° nozzle and with more concentrated spray pressure, this nozzle is best suited for flushing dirt, mud and grime. Uses: Wet-sweeping leaves from walks, curbs and driveways, cleaning stable floors, washing swimming pool bottoms and cleaning barbeque grills.

White 40° Nozzle
This is a wash nozzle. It's wide spray pattern disperses the water pressure over a large area and is recommended for rinsing and moderate washing. Uses: Washing down aluminum siding, cleaning windows, washing vehicles, spraying sidewalks, driveways and patios.

NOZZLE SPRAY PATTERNS


The orifice size of the nozzle determines the operating pressure of your machine. As a rule of thumb, the smaller the orifice, the greater the restriction of water flowing through the machine. This causes the pressure to increase.

  • Choosing a nozzle with too large an orifice will reduce operating pressure.
  • Choosing a nozzle with too small an orifice will limit water flow and possibly create an excessive load on the machine.

Use the table below to select the properly sized nozzle for your machine.
Determine the nozzle size by matching the operating pressure (PSI) of your machine to the gallons per minute (GPM)

Table1

 

Nozzle Orifice Size
      
  
Pounds Per Square Inch (PSI)
 
500 PSI
600 PSI
700 PSI
800 PSI
1000 PSI
1500 PSI
2000 PSI
2500 PSI
3000 PSI
3500 PSI
4000 PSI
4500 PSI
5000 PSI
5500 PSI
6000 PSI
6500 PSI
7000 PSI
7500 PSI
800 PSI

2.0

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
.71
.77
.84
.89
1.0
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.7
1.9
2.0
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.5
.9
1.0
1.0
1.1
1.3
1.6
1.8
2.0
2.2
2.3
2.5
2.7
2.8
2.9
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.8
2.1
2.4
2.6
28
3.0
3.2
3.4
3.5
3.7
3.8
4.0
4.1
4.2
3.5
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.8
2.2
2.5
2.8
3.1
3.3
3.5
3.7
3.9
4.1
4.3
4.5
4.6
4.8
4.9
4.0
1.4
1.6
1.7
1.8
2.0
2.5
2.8
3.2
3.5
3.7
4.0
4.2
4.5
4.7
4.9
5.1
5.3
5.5
5.7
4.5
1.6
1.7
1.9
2.0
2.3
2.8
3.2
3.6
3.9
4.2
4.5
4.8
5.0
5.3
5.5
5.7
6.0
6.2
6.4
5.0
1.8
1.9
2.1
2.2
2.5
3.1
3.5
4.0
4.3
4.7
5.0
5.3
5.6
5.9
6.1
6.4
6.6
6.8
7.1
5.5
1.9
2.1
2.3
2.5
2.8
3.4
3.9
4.1
4.8
5.1
5.5
5.8
6.2
6.4
6.7
7.0
7.3
7.5
7.8
6.0
2.1
2.3
2.5
2.7
3.0
3.7
4.2
4.7
5.2
5.6
6.0
6.4
6.7
7.0
7.3
7.6
7.9
8.2
8.5
6.5
2.3
2.5
2.7
2.9
3.3
4.0
4.6
5.1
5.6
6.1
6.5
6.9
7.3
7.6
8.0
8.3
8.6
8.9
9.2
7.0
2.5
2.7
2.9
3.1
3.5
4.3
4.9
5.5
6.1
6.5
7.0
7.4
7.8
8.2
8.6
8.9
9.3
9.6
9.9
7.5
2.7
2.9
3.1
3.4
3.8
4.6
5.3
5.9
6.5
7.0
7.5
8.0
8.4
8.8
9.2
9.6
9.9
10.3
10.6
8.0
2.8
3.1
3.4
3.6
4.0
4.9
5.7
6.3
6.9
7.5
8.0
8.5
8.9
9.4
9.8
10.2
10.6
11.0
11.3
9.0
3.2
3.5
3.8
4.0
4.5
5.5
6.4
7.1
7.8
8.4
9.0
9.6
10.1
10.6
11.0
11.5
11.9
12.3
12.7
10
3.5
3.9
4.2
4.5
5.0
6.1
7.1
7.9
8.7
9.4
10.0
10.6
11.2
11.7
12.2
12.7
13.2
13.7
14.1
12
4.2
4.6
5.0
5.4
6.0
7.3
8.5
9.5
10.4
11.2
12.0
12.7
13.4
14.1
14.7
15.3
15.9
16.4
17.0
15
5.3
5.8
6.3
6.7
7.5
9.2
10.6
11.9
13.0
14.1
15.0
15.9
16.8
17.6
18.4
19.1
19.8
20.5
21.2